Planning ahead can keep you and your wallet safe from the heat

Some of the hottest temperatures of the season are on the way, with the mercury expected to be near 110 by the end of the week, but there is a bit of good news that's coming ahead of the heat wave.
If you think this summer has been hot, you haven’t seen anything yet.

Some of the hottest temperatures of the season are on the way, with the mercury expected to be near 110 by the end of the week but there is a bit of good news that's coming ahead of the heat wave.

Officials with the California Independent System Operation say the power grid is ready for all the extra air conditioners expected to work overtime in the next few days. No rolling blackouts or power outages are expected.

Now, most people only need to worry about how to save some money while also staying safe in the heat.

"Taking that thermostat and up just a couple of degrees can equal a huge savings when it comes to your electrical bill," said PG&E Spokesperson Katie Allen. For example, moving your thermostat up five degrees can save you about 10% on your electric bill.

Another tip has to do with keeping your air conditioner well maintained.

"That's where a majority of your energy costs are going to come from. So take a look at that filter, the filter that's associated with that AC system, it needs to be cleaned," Allen said.

But what if you're someone who has to face the high temps head on? Doctors say the heat can be deadly in a matter of minutes if people aren't careful.

"If you're not in very good condition, it can be less than an hour. You especially have to watch out for very young children because they don't have the buffer and the reserve," said Dr. Claudia Jonah with the Kern County Health Department.

For anyone who has to be in the heat, doctors say heat related illnesses can attack anyone who's not prepared and recognizing the signs of heat stroke and dehydration could save your life.

"They may get headachey. They may, in the beginning. have a lot of profuse sweating. It gets very serious if they're heated and they get to the point where the amount of sweating goes down, that's a signal for the body getting dehydrated," Dr. Jonah said.

With the hot temperatures, officials want to remind people to check in on elderly neighbors and make sure pets are properly cared for.
 
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