Subsidence: Is the ground sinking?

One of the effects of a depleting water table is subsidence or the surface soil sinking as a result of water leaving the ground too quickly.
One of the effects of a depleting water table is subsidence or the surface soil sinking as a result of water leaving the ground too quickly.

"We're creating a void in the ground where there's no water to support the earth," said Jerry Ezell, General Manager for the Shafter-Wasco Irrigation District. "Once the water is pulled out, the ground can sink."

The U.S. Geological Survey released a report last week about the state of subsidence in the San Joaquin Valley. 17 News contacted one of the researchers, Michelle Sneed, who told us that the study did not focus on any regions in Kern County but that the USGS is currently seeking funding to do an analysis in the area.

The study, however, shows graphically that there are areas of susidence centered around the Delano and Arvin regions where the land has dropped 7 to 12 feet in the most severe cases. According to Sneed this data is from research done by Tom Farr from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasedena.
 
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